snip–><–snip

Electronics

arduino cont.

by on Jan.12, 2011, under Arduino, Coding, Electronics, Uncategorized

Some photos of the prototyping with the lcd and relay replacing the transistor, as well as my workspace:

arduino__cont_001arduino__cont_003arduino__cont_005

arduino__cont_008arduino__cont_010arduino__cont_012

arduino__cont_013

More Photos and code soon.

Leave a Comment :, , , more...

Jump in to arduino

by on Nov.17, 2010, under Arduino, Coding, Electronics

So i spent the next evening converting the proof of concept over for use with the arduino.

I have added some extra bits:

1) A button for triggering the shutter.

2) A button to Increase the shutter open time.

3) A button to Decrease the shutter open time.

.

.

Parts used:

3 x small push buttons.

4x (insert ohms here) resistors

1x long breadboard.

1x npn transistor.

A ton of hook up wires.

.

The buttons were pretty straight forward to hook up, which was nice. The trigger button is connected to pin 12, the “add time / up” button is connected to pin 7 and the “reduce time / down” button is connected to pin 6.

.

second_go

The code to run the buttons looks like this:

</code>

/*
simple program for setting my canon cameras shutter time.

I do long welding glass exposures and this will come in handy so i
wont need to hold the trigger down for too long.
The arduino will do that for me.

*/

#define SHUTTER 13    // defines the shutter control
#define TRIGGER 12    // defines the trigger button
#define UP      7     // defines the +1 second button
#define DOWN    6     // defines the -1 second button
#define SECOND  1001  // defines how long a second is

int curTime = SECOND; // sets the current time to be one second at the
start of the program
int val = 0;           // this is the trigger button control

int upButton = LOW;
int downButton = LOW;

void setup()
{
 pinMode(SHUTTER,OUTPUT);
 pinMode(TRIGGER,INPUT);
 pinMode(UP,INPUT);
 pinMode(DOWN,INPUT);
 Serial.begin(9600);     // open the serial port at 9600 bps:
                         // so we can see what the arduino is doing
                         //before we attach the lcd screen later.
}
// the loop function
void loop()
{
 // get the vars.
 upButton = digitalRead(UP);
 downButton = digitalRead(DOWN);
 val = digitalRead(TRIGGER);

 if (upButton == HIGH)
 {
  // adds one second on to current time
  curTime = curTime + SECOND;
  Serial.print("up button\n");
  delay(200);
 }
 if (downButton == HIGH)
 {
  // removes one second from current time
  curTime = curTime - SECOND;
  Serial.print("down button\n");
  delay(200);
 }

 if (val == HIGH)
 {

  // takes the photo.
  Serial.print("Shutter will be open for: ");
  Serial.print(curTime);
  Serial.print(" miliseconds\n");
  digitalWrite(SHUTTER,HIGH);
  delay(curTime);
  digitalWrite(SHUTTER,LOW);
  Serial.print("shutter closed\n");
 }
 // delays the loop for a tad
 delay(200);
}

<code>

You’ll see that i have my “SECOND” variable set to 1001. I have been running into issues where the shutter open and close time doesn’t match a correct one second interval…. Which is really strange…

Also because i have no way at the moment to display the information, i’m sending debug prints to the serial, so i can view it on the serial monitor.

second_go

.

I found a really good explanation about the canon 3 pin connect Im interfacing with:

Canon N3 details.

.

To finish this project i have a few more steps to do:

a) Add another button to control the mode the device is in.

b) Get hold of a LCD to allow for real world use……

c) Refine the code,  I’m still learning the api,  so im sure i can clean this up a little and work out where my time is going.

d) Start to plan a durable storage case to house the project in.

second_go

.

Leave a Comment :, , , , , more...

Jumping in to electronics

by on Nov.12, 2010, under Arduino, Electronics

So i have finished reading,Make: Getting Started with Arduino for the 2nd time. I have Gotten a few chapters thoughMake: Electronics” . I decided to try and put together a quick proof of concept on the breadboard for the circuit i need to create in order to make the shutter open for a period of time and then close.

I have a Canon 40D as my primary camera, this is the one i use to for the long exposures.

So for my proof of concept, i opened my canon rs-80n3 shutter control to see how the wires need to be setup. I have three alligator clips which i use to connect wires to the bread board.

first_go

There are 3 pins on my canon 40d, shutter, auto focus and one to make the connection back to the camera.

Ive read that a lot of people use an optoisolater to to trigger the shutter. I couldn’t get that to work, so i ended out using an npn transistor.  Then i could use a small current to trigger the shutter.

first_go

I have a 6volt battery pack connected for the power (4xAA). I have used a 22k resistor to limit the flow from the power rail to the transistor.

So when i turn on an off the 6volt battery pack the stutter opens, when i turn it of the shutter closes.

I also hooked up a button to test out, which worked too.

So what i get out of this….

I managed to get the shutter to open and closed based on whether there is a current passing through the npn transistor.

I got to learn about transistors,  optoisolators and ohms…..

I didn’t fry my camera.

Some other pictures can be found at:

first_gofirst_go

Leave a Comment :, , , more...

Looking for something?

Use the form below to search the site:

Still not finding what you're looking for? Drop a comment on a post or contact us so we can take care of it!